Why Do We ‘Blank Out’ in Conversation?-

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Your talking to you friends, boos, or children. It is a simple fact you are trying to recall and you go blank! “My goodness is this Alzheimer’s? Am I going losing my mind? Though frustrating, often this is a quite normal human experience and we will tell you WHY this is happening and what you can do to improve it!

Why does this happen?
We all have different levels of short and long-term memory and levels of attentiveness. People with diagnosis such as ADHD, Anxiety, or Depression will have a harder time because there system is having to work much harder to do the same job as everyone else. Outside of diagnosable conditions, we can only output in our brains efficiently in an imperfect manner. If this is a pattern it can mean we need food, rest, and quiet-time to reset.

Why do we recall it randomly later?
We are human, yet even computers freeze up. Once we cool down, have a mental break, take the pressure off, our brain is able to reboot and access the data again. It is in your hard drive, just takes the brain energy and focus to retrieve.

And what can we do to better access our info?
First of all:
Don’t Be Hard On Yourself. The more you shoot for ‘perfect recall’ the more stress you will have and the harder it will be to achieve.
You have to Self-Care. Rest, diet, and exercise can help you not to get overloaded and will boost your ability to be sharp and at your best.
Stand Confident in The Face of “Potential” Criticism. If socially you focus more on how you are perceived than focusing out on connecting you can easily get your stress level up and you will surely get the brain block that can make recall a nightmare.
Listen Actively. When taking in information be assertive with it. For example, repeat back in your head what people are saying, make eye-contact, and try not to multi-task when you are trying to retain information.

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